12.01.2013

PISSING RAZORS






















"where we come from"
Year:  2001
Country:  US
City:  El Paso, TX
Label:  Spitfire
Format:  CD, LP
Tracks:  10
Time:  40 min.
Lyrical themes:  social issues, politics
Genre:  rock
Style:        Groove Metal

















Pissing Razors is an American groove metal band originally formed in 1996 and disbanded in 2004 after recording six albums. Pissing Razors reunited in 2014 with no new album but touring and making live concerts everywhere. If you weren't aware, Pissing Razors old singer, Joe, left after their third cd fields of disbelief. In my eyes and many other fans, Fields of Disbelief was considered somewhat of a weak cd. Well the doubters should stop worrying, as the band has pulled off a vocalist change very well and put out what could be called their best cd. This is really an awesome cd. The bands sound is pretty much the same as always, but its a little more focused this time. Singer Jason Bragg can pull of a sound pretty similar to Joe, but unique enough that it doesn't sound like he is copying him. A good example of this is track 3, I've Tried. The cd speeds along for the most part, with the majority of the songs being the usual fast paced Pissing Razors style, but still can't touch my two fave PR songs, which are Dodging Bullets and Life of a Lunatic. A few songs slow the pace down a bit, but not drastically. One thing that sort of annoyed me is a few songs start with double bass intros and in the song Keep to Myself, it sounds exactly like Fear Factory does on digimortal. Thats really not much of a complait, but its just something that bugs me. Aside from that, this is a really awesome 36 minutes of headbanging music (review by Dave).
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"fields of disbelief"
Year:  2000
Label:  Noise
Format:  CD
Tracks:  12
Time:  47 min.
Lyrical themes:  social issues, politics
Genre: rock
Style:        Groove Metal




















Only one year after the sinewy, muscular Pantera-influenced powerhouse Cast Down the Plague, Pissing Razors managed to disappoint me slightly with Fields of Disbelief. The band's style is so '90s you can feel it, replete with the arbitrary, collage-type cover art ala Forbidden's Green and rhythm-centric pseudo-thrash assault that only marginally succeeds at linking the chains in a memorable manner. The album certainly isn't entirely without merit, as the production values fit like a glove for the style, and Eddy Garcia has always had a good ear for memorable groove patterns regarding the percussion aspect. The problem is that the riffs feel a bit more watered down, dogged by more droning half-time breakdown sections than necessary. We need more thrash tucked into the folds.





Rodriguez's ragged howl is hardly the band's strongest suit, but he carries the vocal day with enough voracious abandon to pass muster. Pissing Razors is at their best when they fuse sludgy '90s groove with just enough thrash ballast to propel the remainder appreciably. The title track is a good example of the two coexisting at their best, dripping with vulgar attitude and sledgehammer groove posturing. Leads are scarce, and this ends up being the band's Achilles' heel, as it were. Save for a few bluesy drawls, technical leads are virtually nowhere to be found, which puts too much pressure on the rhythm to carry the entirety of Fields of Disbelief. Pissing Razors are better than most at this style, so they don't make complete fools of themselves here, but the deterioration from the last album is palpable and undeniable.





Every time I listen to this album I'm into it for about the first half, then it just begins to devolve into samey '90s groove slush, percussion-dependant and without any experimental deviations to keep proceedings at least somewhat-fresh. Tracks like "Three" have some monster, monolithic grooves that really prove that the band still had it at this point, but twelve straight tracks of this stuff is hard to stomach in a single sitting, which I can't help but strike against the band. The aforementioned title track and "Voice of Reason" have some faster, tense moments of half-thrash mayhem, but Fields of Disbelief can't help but feel like the first of many missteps by Pissing Razors after a damn impressive streak through the '90s. Now that the band has reformed, let's hope they get back to basics. I know Garcia still has the chops, at least (review by Damhea).
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"idem"
Year:  1998
Label:  Noise
Format:  CD, LP
Tracks:  13
Time:  40 min.
Lyrical themes:  social issues, politics
Genre:  rock
Style:        Groove Metal






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