1.31.2013

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"demanufacture"
Year:  1995
Label:  Warner Music
Format:  CD, LP
Tracks:  13
Time:  60 min.
Genre:  electronic
Style:        Industrial        Metal



















Talk about utter brutality and annihilation in the sense of music of metal and variation. The whole of the release is totally intense and fueled with utter hatred, intensity, violence, and also at times severing away from the womb of metal where it doesn't seem like it's born. I mean in a sense that not everything here is totally brutal. There are times here that have utter atmospheric choruses and sheer perfection in the sense of sound plus production weaving it's metal way sifting through barriers and just severing the spirit equalling total metal invigoration, commencement, variability fueled with massive vibe of original metalish collection of tunes.





Baffled me my first hearing years ago, then hearing Obsolete and thinking this album surpasses that one much more intensely. What we have here is a B-tuning guitar that's filled with such heaviness and crunch, goes well along with the heavy grunted vocals with it's manifestation of utter originality not mention genius in songwriting essence. And album that can be heard totally tons of times and be like maybe no way that you can get tired of it because it includes so many variations and atmospheres. The band really came together with such great thoughts in the way of making sounds like never heard before.





Aggressive vocals most of the time and the guitar just thick, chunky (as previously stated), bar chord complexity alongside clean vocals that goes well with it during those periods amongst the synthesizers that are orchestrated during chorus bits or just amiable errants of ringtone vox paving it's way to metal in a fashion like no other. The music overall is a complexity in effect making it hard to pinpoint where the up and down swings land themselves in, keeping the listener interested because of such variability. A total metal album that just fuels the fire of exasperating feel to it that makes it dominant in all aspects.





Rating this album as a 100% is not off in any way because I hear just utmost sincerity of pure imagination. That imagination is not more important than what is real here. We have guitars hitting home with no leads, but just heavy guitar bits, vocals that vary up all of the time, drums that just pound into your cranium with the mixing of these instruments was just mystifying and so well done. The quality is totally there. Some of the songs seemed to indicate a lack of proper definition, but that's where they got experimental with sound. Not everything is considered to be pure metal supremacy, but more so a total outlet of an experience to hear when you're pissed off or just want sounds.





I'd have to conclude that the band as a whole really dominated in all aspects and Demanufacture is just a symbol of metal supremacy that's reinforced time and time again. Yes they did fool around with those wicked keys and not every song on here is totally with aggression, some with stagnant lack of perspiration, on the ones that make you sweat are the ones to capture the most of. Just taste a tune such as "Self Bias Resistor" and total imagination in writing achieves it's peak in complexity, tempo change and sheer metal domination. I'd say that this album as a whole was the bands best contribution to metal that they could've possibly achieved. Own this! (*review by Orbitball ).
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"obsolete"
Year:  1998
Label:  Warner Music
Format:  CD, LP
Tracks:  13
Time:  60 min.
Genre:  electronic
Style:        Industrial        Metal






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